Archives For judgment

As 2013 winds down, I will be re-posting the top three original blog entries of this year. Included in the repost will be some fresh comments detailing why I believe these were so popular.

The third most popular post was: Do You Hate Your Life (at least parts of it)
The second most popular was: 8 Traits of Grace-Filled Leadership

and the most popular post of 2013 with fresh comments is……..Surviving in an Anti-God Society

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The airwaves of social media are laden with the demise of America. Christians are seen mourning over election results and some are stocking up on guns.

The question of surviving in an increasingly anti-God society seems to come up often.

I recently finished teaching the book of Daniel, which also asks this question. Daniel was taken captive from Jerusalem to Babylon. He was indoctrinated with the culture and customs of Babylon in an attempt to strip him of his Jewish identity. Daniel was forced to serve in a horrible, pagan government.

Stop Comparing!

April 19, 2012

You may be sick of me talking about Cross-Cultural Servanthood: Serving the World in Christlike Humility, but  it is profoundly influencing what I am thinking about. (I think that is the goal of every author, at least this one!)

My thought today has to do with Duane Elmer’s exploration of ethnocentrism. In other words, the view of life through the filter of one’s own culture, believing it to be the best.

When you move overseas you constantly compare things to your homeland. The way people drive, what people where, the food you eat, as well as the general sense of cleanliness, time, and productivity.

Perpetual comparison becomes exhausting. It wearies one to always be searching for ways in which your culture is superior. This can keep us from realizing how amazing the people and nation we serve in actually are.

So, STOP IT!

“Poor people are lazy.”
“You must eat snakes and play with lions(if you live in Africa).”
“Americans are fat.”

People are famous for making assumptions and stereotypes. Often they are extremely painful.

We recently had a time on our missions campus of sharing different perspectives from various cultures. We laughed, we cried, and we felt each other’s pain.

I’m reminded of three things that I know to be true. It is also these three things that I need to be challenged to regularly apply in my life in missions.

1. Avoid Assumption
I know plenty of lazy rich people and even a few thin Americans!

No one enjoyes being boxed in by assumptions. When they happen in a cross cultural setting, it is easy to become isolated and critical. Victory comes when we don’t see each other by our nationality, skin color, or economic status; but rather as people.