Archives For humility

The End of Me

December 16, 2015

“Finish the sentence, “Jesus became real when….”

Often our walk with the Lord is relegated to an afterthought when life is good. It takes a tragedy, a bad medical prognosis, or news of an impending crisis to force us to our knees.

It is precisely during those times when Jesus becomes a more realized presence in our hearts and lives.

I’ve recently seen some friends who nearly lost a newborn express this sentiment saying, “I  can say this was a time of depth with my God that I did not know existed.”

This sentiment perfectly illustrates the premise of this book.

“Jesus became real when I came to the end of me.”

I was asked to review Kyle Idleman’s new book, The End of Me: Where Real Life in the Upside-Down Ways of Jesus Begins.

Better Together

October 1, 2015

As a zealous, young missionary I seemed to make the same mistake over and over. Now as a veteran, I find the same never-ending truth must remain continually before me.

People are not our projects.

We never set out to do this intentionally. Our mistakes are made in ignorance. Our desire is to do good, to help others, and to bring change.

Even with these godly desires, we must remain ever careful to not walk in superiority and arrogance.

The message “I have something to give you” may be true, but must be balanced out with a healthy dose of humility and a learning spirit.

Because the truth is, we all have something to give each other.

Examine these two statements. Although similar, they can create two completely different perspectives.

“I have walked with so and so for this many years.”

and

Thriving in Babylon

June 18, 2015

I live in South Africa. Our president has multiple wives, has had numerous trials for corruption and other crimes, and it has been proven he used millions of public money for his personal house. Even so, compared to some other presidents around the world, ours is a saint.

The multitude of Facebook comments from America reflect a similar frustration with politics and leaders. I would argue whoever occupies the White House is “not that bad” compared to many world leaders, but the frustration remains. In fact, it seems to be despair at times.

Dr. Larry Osborne’s new book, Thriving in Babylon: Why Hope, Humility, and Wisdom Matter in a Godless Culture addresses this sense of despair by looking at the life of Daniel.

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Daniel saw his beloved city, Jerusalem,  destroyed and was taken captive to a pagan land of Babylon. He was made to learn its culture and religion. Daniel thrived in Babylon by having a different perspective. He faced evil and endured physical hardship, knowing God had a plan.

The Bible is full of leadership traits and characteristics. Many of these are not applied.

We all know of countless examples where leaders had a love of money, did not walk in sexual fidelity, or raise those dreaded “PK’s” (pastor’s kids, indicating they have issues in their family).

None of us apply all the leadership principles all the time. We are not perfect people.

But, are their some traits which we flat overlook?

I’d like to propose the two of the most overlooked leadership traits are found in a list of characteristics of overseers and deacons in 1 Timothy 3.

1. Gentleness (1 Tim. 3:3)
You will not find this in most leadership books on the market. Many consider gentleness to be weak while leaders are meant strong. If you think this is the perspective in modern times, it was much, much more in the male-dominated culture of the first century.

Stop Comparing!

April 19, 2012

You may be sick of me talking about Cross-Cultural Servanthood: Serving the World in Christlike Humility, but  it is profoundly influencing what I am thinking about. (I think that is the goal of every author, at least this one!)

My thought today has to do with Duane Elmer’s exploration of ethnocentrism. In other words, the view of life through the filter of one’s own culture, believing it to be the best.

When you move overseas you constantly compare things to your homeland. The way people drive, what people where, the food you eat, as well as the general sense of cleanliness, time, and productivity.

Perpetual comparison becomes exhausting. It wearies one to always be searching for ways in which your culture is superior. This can keep us from realizing how amazing the people and nation we serve in actually are.

So, STOP IT!