Archives For frustration

Where is God When…?

November 6, 2013

When tragedy strikes, a question on the heels of this event involves some form of “Where is God?”

As the horrors on the nightly news bombard us, it is simple to surmise God must have wound up the universe and let it go.

Otherwise, we head down a path of unanswerable questions.

If God is all-powerful, why didn’t he stop this?
When the Bible promises God works for our good, how can bad things happen?
Why do bad things happen to good people?

Phillip Yancey has made a career of exploring these difficult questions. His pursuit stems from his childhood and early writing career. When investigating tragedy, Christians “often made it worse by offering contradictory and confusing counsel.”

God is punishing you.
“It’s Satan!”
“God has afflicted you out of love, not punishment.”

We, like Yancey, often have no idea how to respond to these statements.

Which is better? To work at pleasing God or to focusing on trusting God?

Where should we focus more of our attention and effort?

In their book, The Cure: What If God Isn’t Who You Think He Is And Neither Are You, Bill Thrall, Bruce McNicol, and John S. Lynch explore this tension.

The Cure is part teaching, part allegory in the style of Pilgrims Progress. The book begins with the traveler facing two different forks in the road, one leading to Trusting God and the other to Pleasing God. Take a look at the description:

“I look up at the Trusting God sign. This has to be a trap, a trick question. It sounds good, but it doesn’t give me anything to do. It’s too passive. How will I make a difference? If God and I are going to be in sync, there’s got to be something more than trust. If the issue is me, I’m probably not going to future out my destiny simple by trusting God.

When we see the ordinary events of our lives begin to intersect with things we are reading and studying, it usually means God is trying to get our attention.

I posted on Friday about “Losing the Plot” in our lives and ministries. Literally hours later, I found myself reading a portion from The Executive and the Elephant: A Leader’s Guide for Building Inner Excellence by Richard L. Daft that added another stream to my contemplation.

While not a Christian oriented book, the leadership principles of the inner life affect how we view events and circumstances.

Daft says, “Our perceptions are based more on our needs and biases than on external events or reality…most distortions are in our favor

In light of this, he lists Six Mental Mistakes Leaders Make. Here they are:

Have You Lost the Plot?

March 2, 2012

In 20 years of leadership I have seen many times where situations or circumstances have clouded my judgment and ability to see clearly. In those times, warning signs appear, showing me that I am in danger of losing the plot, the big picture, or even my perspective.

I have recently seen a number of these things flare up in my own life that reminded me of the need to see the sky through the clouds.

I am going to share these perspectives through the grid of ministry, but they are true anywhere people are involved. Be that a family, a business, or even a marriage. We can lose sight of the what the greater story is.

Here are four signs that you may have lost the plot: